Tag: mind.

  • Useful Commutes and Masked Cows

    Studies show the morning commute is the least favorite part of the day, and the commute home the third-least favorite, but it’s also possible to miss aspects of that enforced time between work and home. For all its downsides, the daily commute does have some positives. Anthony and Jeff discuss the science behind commuting, and how we can adapt in a new world. Then, there are 1.6 billion cattle on Earth, and their burps and farts are becoming a big problem. Cows expel methane, which is approximately 84 times more potent than carbon dioxide when it comes to warming the planet. Jeff and Anthony look at a company proposing an unusual solution to a very big problem. [more]

  • Lethal Collection

    "What if we told you we could back up your mind?" That's the business pitch of Nectome, a preserve-your-brain-and-upload-it company. The catch? They have to kill you first. Its chemical solution can keep a body intact for hundreds of years, maybe thousands, as a statue of frozen glass. The idea is that someday in the future scientists will scan your bricked brain and turn it into a computer simulation. That way, someone a lot like you, though not exactly you, will smell the flowers again in a data server somewhere. Jeff and Anthony accuse each other of already having undergone the procedure. [more]

  • Deja View

    Most of us know it - that weird, sudden feeling of experiencing something not for the first time. It's called déjà vu - French for "already seen" - and it's an uncanny feeling. But according to new research, that's all it is. Just a feeling. The most accepted explanation is that it has to do with memory. Much like a word can be on the tip of your tongue, a memory could be on the tip of your mind - there, but not quite accessible. Jeff and Anthony think they might have done this story before. [more]

  • Retro Virus

    Inside the brain, proteins don’t stick around longer than a few minutes. And yet, our memories can hang on for our entire lifetime. Recently, an international collaboration of researchers discovered something strange about a protein called Arc. This is essential to long-term memory formation. What they found was that it has very similar properties to how a virus infects its host. Jeff and Anthony consider what life could have been like without the ability to remember. [more]

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