Tag: study

  • Deadlines and the Do Nothing Rent-a-Man

    A new experiment tests the non-monotonic effect of deadline length on task completion. What does that mean? Anthony and Jeff will procrastinate to the absolute last minute, but is that the norm? How do deadlines impact getting things done? Then, as a "Do Nothing Rent-a-Man" 38-year old Shoji Morimoto might have the world's best job. Then again, maybe not! Jeff and Anthony dig into this very unique profession. [more]

  • See Holograms and Remember your Purpose

    A San Jose company has announced a brand new technology that might finally deliver on the promise of real holograms. Jeff and Anthony define the term and dig into what makes this new tech so exciting. Then, a new study by Florida State University researchers showed a link between an individual’s sense of purpose and their ability to recall vivid details. Anthony and Jeff try to figure out their own purpose and whether it might help them remember where they put their keys. [more]

  • Hot Streaks (with Josh Macuga)

    Jeff and Anthony are joined this week by host, comedian, and board game designer, Josh Macuga to talk about hot streaks! Is there some way for science to quantify how and when artists hit a prolific period? What is better, exploiting a specific style and idea, or exploring many different ones? Anthony, Jeff, and Josh dig into a new study that aims to answer these questions and more! [more]

  • Human Growth Plants and Zen and the Art of Lying

    In an effort to combat global hunger, scientists are attempting to create crops with a higher yield without enlarging their footprint. Researchers have even transferred a human protein into plants to supersize them, with results that are surprising even them. Jeff and Anthony discuss this bizarre and promising method and what it might mean for the world. Then, how do we know when someone is lying? A new study shows that our instincts for determining the honesty in other might be completely skewed. Anthony and Jeff lie to each other to find out. [more]

  • Hot Heads and Cellular Fluidics

    The hotter the temperature, the more violent humans get. So concludes a new study that compared the rates of violence in the inmate populations of prisons with climate control and those without. Anthony and Jeff take a look at the data, and what it says about human nature and humans in nature. Then, a new breakthrough allows liquids and gases to be transported through porous materials without leaking. Jeff and Anthony examine all of the amazing applications this new tech will enable. [more]

  • Mystery’s Afoot and Selfless Parrots

    When fifteen different severed feet washed up in a section of the Pacific Northwest called the Salish Sea, speculation ran wild of a serial killer, or some other nefarious culprit. But when scientists started to study the are, they discovered an explanation even more incredible. Jeff and Anthony look into the Mystery of the Floating Feet. Then, can birds be selfless? New research into two species of parrot reveals a surprising capacity for generosity. Anthony and Jeff discuss what that means for our understanding of animals. [more]

  • Butterflies in the Rain and More Memories

    A drop of rain hitting a butterfly is the equivalent of a bowling ball hitting a human. So how do they survive in the rain? New research reveals a fascinating answer. Jeff and Anthony discuss how the butterfly's natural defenses from rain can be applied to human beings. Then, what if the memory could be stimulated by external means? Anthony and Jeff debate the usefulness of trans-cranial stimulation, based on a new study. [more]

  • Leave Your Phone and Why You Left?

    Is your cell phone making you dumber, just by being near you? Researchers now have evidence that the closer your smart device is to you, the less smart you actually are. Anthony and Jeff discuss phone addiction, and what to do with this research. The, both Jeff and Anthony are left-handed. But what does that mean scientifically? And why? They delve into the murky waters of handedness and sort through the prevailing theories. [more]

  • Giving and Gorging

    People are more likely appreciate gifts that save time over gifts that save money. This, according to a new study that looked at how people estimate social status when receiving a gift. Anthony and Jeff talk about the best kind of gifts, and whether saving someone time is really more valuable. Then, scientific analysis suggests competitive eaters have come within nine hotdogs of the limits of human performance. Jeff and Anthony discuss stuffing food into your face for sport, and whether there really is such thing as an insurmountable limit. [more]

  • Psych Warn

    The Stanford Prison Experiment, one of the most famous and compelling psychological studies of all time, told us a tantalizingly simple story about human nature. This experiment has been included in many, many introductory psychology textbooks and is often cited uncritically. But its findings were wrong. Very wrong. And not just due to its questionable ethics or lack of concrete data — but because of deceit. Jeff and Anthony try the experiment out for themselves and flip a coin to see who gets to be the guard. [more]

Do NOT join our secret society. You’ll just wind up with a bunch of cool stuff. It’s gross.