Recent Posts

  • See Holograms and Remember your Purpose

    A San Jose company has announced a brand new technology that might finally deliver on the promise of real holograms. Jeff and Anthony define the term and dig into what makes this new tech so exciting. Then, a new study by Florida State University researchers showed a link between an individual’s sense of purpose and their ability to recall vivid details. Anthony and Jeff try to figure out their own purpose and whether it might help them remember where they put their keys. [more]

  • Shock Therapy and Space Mummies

    Researchers claim, for the first time, to have used custom-fitted deep brain stimulation to substantially alleviate a patient’s decades-long bout with severe depression. Anthony and Jeff discuss the scientific and ethical ramifications of re-wiring the brain with actual wires. Then, what happens to dead bodies on Mars? If humans are gonna go there, then we better be thinking about it! Luckily, scientists are, and Jeff and Anthony might not like the conclusions. [more]

  • Hot Streaks (with Josh Macuga)

    Jeff and Anthony are joined this week by host, comedian, and board game designer, Josh Macuga to talk about hot streaks! Is there some way for science to quantify how and when artists hit a prolific period? What is better, exploiting a specific style and idea, or exploring many different ones? Anthony, Jeff, and Josh dig into a new study that aims to answer these questions and more! [more]

  • Potty Trained Cows and a Whiter White

    Two stories about small, unexpected ways scientists are trying to combat global climate change. First, can greenhouse gases be reduced by training cows to pee in a toilet? Can cows be trained to pee in a toilet? Researchers from Germany are trying to find out, and Jeff and Anthony have opinions! Then, what if you could dramatically reduce the amount of energy needed to cool your home by simply painting the roof? Scientists at Purdue believe their new world record holding white paint could do just that. Anthony and Jeff take a look. [more]

  • And the Winners Are…

    It's that time of year again! The winners of this year's Ig Nobel Prizes have been announced and Anthony and Jeff couldn't be more excited. Every year, the fine folks at Improbable Research award Ig Nobel Prizes to scientists and researchers who have advanced our understanding of the world in ways that border on the unnecessary. They are fun, funny, and fascinating. The journal Nature has said “The Ig Nobel awards are arguably the highlight of the scientific calendar” and you can tune in this week and find out why. [more]

  • Human Growth Plants and Zen and the Art of Lying

    In an effort to combat global hunger, scientists are attempting to create crops with a higher yield without enlarging their footprint. Researchers have even transferred a human protein into plants to supersize them, with results that are surprising even them. Jeff and Anthony discuss this bizarre and promising method and what it might mean for the world. Then, how do we know when someone is lying? A new study shows that our instincts for determining the honesty in other might be completely skewed. Anthony and Jeff lie to each other to find out. [more]

  • Daddy Short Legs and Chemical Violins

    Scientists have created "daddy shortlegs," a stunted version of the common household pest daddy longlegs, by suppressing the genes behind the arachnid's famously elongated limbs. Anthony and Jeff ask why - and how - and are surprised by the answers. Then, new research has confirmed that renowned violin maker Antonio Stradivari and others treated their instruments with various chemicals that produced their unique sound. Jeff and Anthony discuss whether this diminishes or enhances the famous artistry at work. [more]

  • Working for Food and Space Pizza

    Many animals prefer performing tasks to get food — called "contrafreeloading" - over just getting food for free. But there are two major mammals that buck that trend. Can you guess what they are? Jeff and Anthony discuss effort and sustenance. Then, is eating in space boring? No anymore! NASA has been experimenting with oven on the ISS, allowing astronauts to bake pizza and cookies! Anthony and Jeff dive into the science behind space baking. [more]

  • Vibing Minds and Robot Inventors

    When we cooperate on certain tasks, our brainwaves might synchronize. So says a new finding from researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology in Japan. Anthony and Jeff discuss what that might mean for how we understand consciousness and the brain. Then, if an AI can come up with new concepts, should it be able to get the credit? A court decision in Australia is awarding authorship of two patents to a non-human. Jeff and Anthony weigh in on robot inventors. [more]

  • The Kids are Lonely and Close the Open Floorplan

    A new study finds that a number of markers of loneliness in teenagers has increased significantly in recent years. Anthony and Jeff discuss this trend, what might be causing it, and whether is should be worrisome. Then, 70% of office workers before COVID worked in open floorplan office structures. For the first time, a scientific study has tested the effects of that kind of environment on workers. Jeff and Anthony look at ways they might be improved as the world returns to the office. [more]

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